Applied Mechanics News

Friday, February 10, 2006

2006 NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials

Co-sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineering, the NASA URETI on Biologically Inspired Materials, the NU Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center, Northwestern University, and the CSET , NSF IGERT on Virtual Tribology and AVS Science & Technology Society, NSF announces the schedule of 2006 NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials.

In the summer of 2006, there will be two courses offered in NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials:

1. Science Fundamentals for Nano- and Bio-Mechanics of Materials (7/31/06-8/04/06), and
2. Micro and Nano Devices with Applications to Biology and Nanoelectronics (8/7/06-8/11/06).

You can find the information on registrations and fellowship applications for 2006 NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials online.

Since 2003, about 370 professors, post doctors and others have participated in the NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials . This effort, funded by NSF- CMS Division, plays a key role in workforce development in an important emerging area. It provides access to specialized courses in nanotechnology not available at many universities and stimulates the development of new course materials. Designed to be accessible to students with BS degree in

(2004 NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials)

engineering, the courses provide an opportunity for students and researchers at many levels to enhance their understanding of frontier areas in nanotechnology. The courses also play a key role in promoting research collaborations and providing mentoring to students. It also has a snowball effect in that faculty members who enrolled in the Summer Institute will be able to teach what they learned to their students at their own universities.
One summer 2005 session featured a course on Nanoscale Mechanics, Bio-inspired Hierarchical Structures, and Potential Applications. This short course, featuring the rapid advances in nanotechnology, nanomaterials and nanomechanics which offer huge potentials in private

(2003 NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials)

industry, homeland security, and national defense, presented the concepts of bio-mimetics and bio-inspiration as a guide to future materials. An emphasis on nanoscale design of materials will make our manufacturing technologies and infrastructure more sustainable in terms of reduced energy usage and environmental pollution. In the last summer institute, there were 92 participants, including 49 professors, 4 post doctors, 31 graduate students, 7 industry members, and 1 high school teacher.


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